Excerpts

Excerpt from “Give ’em Hell” Harry’s Liberation of Korea:

During the Korean War the United States intentionally and without apology tried to kill almost every man, woman and child in North Korea, and, with less intention and some apology, did the same to our “allies” in South Korea. Korea became a playground for American Air Power. New and bigger bombs were tested. Faster and more destructive fighter jets were developed. New techniques for destroying large dams, rice crops and cities were introduced. There was no North or South Korea to our Bombers, only “gooks” and targets. The deliberate burning of cities and killing of civilians in North Korea was called “strategic bombing,” while the inevitable burning of cities and the killing of civilians in South Korea was called “collateral damage.”


Excerpt from “Give ’em Hell” Harry’s Liberation of Korea:

It appears that the only sin committed by the tens of thousands of people living in these villages, towns and cities that were now OK to incinerate, was the fact that they lived close enough to the borders so that the Chinese and Russians could actually watch them go up in flames. Without question this decision to “burn them if you so desire” was an act of terror, either by Webster’s definition, US Statutes or international treaties.


Excerpt from “Give ’em Hell” Harry’s Liberation of Korea:

However, MacArthur would not let his airmen feel unwanted. “He [MacArthur] stated that he realized that there were not many targets left for the ’29’s but he wanted to get them back to business. ” Therefore MacArthur, during the same morning meeting on November 3rd did agree to let Stratemeyer show off his pyrotechnics on some other towns. Stratemeyer suggested to MacArthur “that as a lesson we could burn some other towns in North Korea and I indicated the town of Kanggye which I believe is occupied by enemy troops and is a communications center – both rail and road. He said, ‘Burn it if you so desire,’ and then said, ‘Not only that, Strat, but burn and destroy as a lesson any other of those towns that you consider of military value to the enemy. “


Excerpt from “Give ’em Hell” Harry’s Liberation of Korea:

Truman asked what there was left for the fighting in Korea. MacArthur said that there were about 100,000 North Koreans troops left and that “it goes against my grain to have to destroy them. They are only fighting to save face. Orientals prefer to die rather than to lose face.” Nevertheless he expected the fighting to end by Thanksgiving and that he could return all the troops by Christmas.


Excerpt from “Give ’em Hell” Harry’s Liberation of Korea:

The whole story of the consequent Wake Island Conference between Truman and MacArthur is an embarrassment for all involved, and particularly for the institution of the Presidency. As some press reporters commented at the time, Truman was blatantly trying to capitalize on MacArthur’s successes before it was all over. But things just did not work out as planned. MacArthur treated the President with obvious disdain from even before the beginning of the Conference; and then gave him the “bum’s rush” at Wake. Truman, however, pretended not to notice, so hungry was he for pictures with the popular war hero MacArthur.


Excerpt from “Give ’em Hell” Harry’s Liberation of Korea:

When he was called upon to assist in the Korean civil war, [General] Le May saw no reason why the US should not just continue where it had left off in World War II, the massive firebombing of enemy cities. He had orchestrated the burning of Tokyo and numerous other Japanese cities. Now the cities, villages and towns in Korea, with their wooden and thatched homes and buildings, close together streets and lack of fire-fighting abilities, would make perfect targets. That the Koreans, unlike the Japanese and Germans, had not declared war against the US or killed a single one of our soldiers, did not make any difference to LeMay. An enemy was an enemy.

 

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